Monday, November 13, 2017

Bartolome Esteban Murillo, self portrait, ca 1670
The Frick Museum's significant role as the custodian of ancient art is also one of New York's most quiet and revered places to discover the Old Masters and retreat for quiet contemplation in its inner fountain courtyard.  With its rare paintings by the Old Masters The Frick reminds us to remember the great painters who set the ancient course of art history. 
      Paying tribute one of Italy's renowned artist's  achievements, this year marks the 400th anniversary of the birth of one of the most celebrated painters of the Spanish Golden Age, Bartolome Esteban Murillo (1617-1682). The exhibition runs through February 4, 2018 after which it moves to London's
National Gallery from February 28 through May 21, 2018.
     Murillo, the self portrait, pictured at the left, ca. 1670, attests to the artist's profession. The elegantly rendered Latin inscription below the portrait translates, "Bartolome Murillo painted himself to fulfill the wishes and prayers of his children." This is a second self-portrait, similar to an earlier one, but the trompe l'oeil stone frame around Murillo's image is more elaborate, decorated with scrolls and idealized foliage.  Flanking the frame, the artist's had engagingly holds the frame and there on the ledgeare the signature attributes of an artist including painter's brushes and palette.  
     
Murillo's Two Women in a Window ca. 1655-60 
Murillo's career was a successful one, and he painted canvases for the most important patrons and churches in Seville, and also created allegorical and genre scenes.  Image Right: Murillo's Two Women remains one of the best known and most mysterious of Murillo's paintings. The affect of these two figures emerging from the window is exceptionally realistic. The women have been identified as servants or prostitutes. A Spanish proverb from the period warns that "a woman at the window a grape of the street." It is interesting to note that the nature of the painting's commission and its message remains, unknown. However, his portraits of 
urchins in the street of Seville are particularly well known, and together with Immaculates and other religious images, they remain his signature works. The Museum Shop offers a richly illustrated publication.
     Concurrently on exhibit are two Venetian Renaissance Masterpieces by the celebrated artist
Pablo Veronese (1528-1588), St. Jerome in the Wilderness and St. Agatha Visited by St. Peter. 
The two rarely seen canvases left Italy for the first time since their creation, over 450 years ago. And thanks to Venetian Heritage and the sponsorship of BVLGARI, they have been fully restored and returned to their original glory. On view through March 28, 2018, this provides a unique opportunity to discover two masterpieces in the Frick's unique setting. 
       
Veronese St. Agatha Visited in Prison by St. Peter (1566-57)
St. Agatha was a third-century martyr from Sicily who lived in Catania at the time of the Christian persecution under Roman emperor Decius. Of noble origin she had pledged her chastity to God and therefore would not yield to the advances of Quintianus, a Roman consul, who was enticed by her beauty. When she refused to worship pagan idols, he sent her to prison where she was tortured and Quintianus ordered her breasts be cut off. In St. Agatha, Veronese sets the scene in Agatha's agony, her wounded breasts a testament to her devotion. In the dark prison cell. she steadies herself against the bench, surprised by two visitors that burst into her cell. A glorious blond angel dressed in light blue holds a long taper, he precedes St. Peter, who stands by the open door. In his left hand he holds the keys to heaven and with his right hand he gestures upward, referring at once to his celestial mission and to Agatha's imminent healing, and possibly death and heavenly reward. The two paintings, Agatha and St. Jerome in the Wilderness (1566-67) are Murano photo credited to: Ufficio Beni Culurali del Patriarcato di Venezia, Accompanying the exhibition is a richly illustrated publication, available in the Museum shop.

      Ta ta Darlings!!!  The dual exhibition is a breathtaking experience, worth your while to spend an hour or two reveling in their remarkable restoration. Then too, before heading out to the cacophony of New York City, take a some time to sit for awhile in the quiet fountain courtyard. Fan mail is always welcome www.pollytalknyc@gmail.com.  Visit Polly's Blogs at www.pollytalk.com and click in the left-hand column to the Blog that resonates with your interest on visionary men, women determined to succeed, the fashion historian and poetry.

Monday, October 23, 2017

LOVING VINCENT, A Masterpiece: Review By Polly Guerin

No other artist has attracted more legends and controversy over his death than Vincent van Gogh. Variously labelled a madman, a genius, even a layabout, the real Vincent is at once revealed in his letters, and obscured by myth and time. Vincent himself said in his last letter, 'We cannot speak other than by our paintings'. The film LOVING VINCENT takes Vincent at his word and lets the paintings tell the real story of Vincent van Gogh's life. 
      The film is an art lover's dream with storytelling charm that sheds new light on the great artist, so misunderstood, bullied and so under appreciated in his time. His genius was great but sadly he sold but one painting during his entire life. LOVING VINCENT can be enjoyed as a gigantic painting, bursting with colors, mesmerizing with its reproductions of familiar faces and places, but as remarkable as Vincent's brilliant paintings, is the portrayal of his passionate and ill-fated life, and mysterious death. 
      It was first shot as a live action film with actors, and then hand-painted over frame-by-frame in oils.  The final effect is an interaction of the performance of the actors playing Vincent's famous portraits and the performance of the painting animators, bringing those characters into the medium of paint.
     This is a first time in cinematic history that a movie has been created exclusively using handmade paintings in an animated feature film.   Every one of the 65,000 frames of the film is an oil-painting hand-painted by 125 professional oil painters who painted directly onto the rushes while trying to remain as faithful as possible to Van Gogh's technique and style.  The start and end of each shot is the exact copy of one of Van Gogh's works. A total of 94 paintings were fully reproduced, and 31 ere partially recreated.    
       The result is an example pure visual enchantment in which some of the world's most renowned paintings are animated, such as The Starry Night, Portrait of Dr. Cachet, Wheatfield with Crows, and The Night Cafe, pictured right. And we also meet again Doctor Gachet, and his daughter Marguerite Gachet. Then too, he painted many other famous faces that match the famous paintings they portray.  
Jospeh Roulin, Postman
The film begins in the summer of 1891, one year after Van Gogh's suicide. Armand Roulin, is asked by his father, the postman, Joseph Roulin, one of Van Gogh's favorite models,  to deliver a posthumous letter to Van Gogh's brother Theo. Armand, who becomes a central character in the film, is not pleased with the task as he never approved of his father's friendship with the artist. Yet he dutifully goes to Paris only to learn that Theo, devastated by the death of his brother, had only lived a few months after Vincent's suicide. He then travels to Auvers-sur-Oise to shed light on the mysterious circumstances surrounding Vincent's death.   Armand becomes central to the investigation, 'Was Vincent murdered,' and in so doing encounters Dr. Gachet and questions him about the real circumstances behind Vincent's death. Alas you will have to see the movie to find out.     
The Cafe Terrace Place de Forum, Arles
Breathing life into Van Gogh's painting was written and directed by young Polish director Dorota Kobiela and the British producer Hugh Welchman. produced by Poland's BreakThru Films & UK's Trademark films.  The duo animated a selection of oil paintings created in the style of the Dutch master to portray the final weeks of the painter's life in Auvers-sur-Oise in the Paris region, where he was staying at the time of his death in the south of France. The collaborators drew inspiration for the film from the wealth of letters Van Gogh exchanged with his family.  

      Find LOVING VINCENT at local movie theaters. The film introduces theater actor Robert Gulaczyk in his first film role as Vincent van Gogh, and Armand Roulin, central to the story, is played by Douglas Booth.  Sharing the spotlight Chris O'Dowd is the Postman, Joseph Roulin.
      Doctor Gachet is portrayed by Jerome Flynn and his daughter Marguerite Gachet is played by Saoirse Ronan; Helen McCrory plays Louise Chevelier, house-keeper to Doctor Gachet. Notable, too, is Aidan Turner is the Boatman from Vincent's Bank of the Oise-sur-Oise painting. Thanks to the magazine FRANCE-AMERIQUE for story details.
      Ta Ta Darlings! I loved this film, but I had a feeling of great sadness after viewing how Van Gogh was tormented by local bullies in Auvers-sur-Oise, and disrespected by local individuals, and then, too, did he really commit suicide or was he murdered?
     Fan mail always welcome please send your comments to pollytalknyc@gmail.com. Visit Polly's Blogs at www.pollytalk.com and click in the left hand column to the blog that resonates with your interest on visionary men, women determined to succeed, the fashion historian and poetry.

Monday, October 16, 2017

KOREAN SPIRIT & CULtURE PROMOTION PROJECT: kSCPP: Review by Polly Guerin

King Sejong the Great
Korea is a land of beauty and fascination. Its language of antiquity came from King Sejong the Great, but its standard today reflects a modern country that holds an important role among the nations of the world. Early on Korea entered the digital age and prominent firms also emerged, such as Samsung, Then, too, significant scientific and medical advances including robotic surgeries were "firsts" here. 
         However, there is ever so much more to tell you about Korea, therefore, if you are student of the cultures that bind us all to history then plan a visit to the KOREAN SPIRIT & CULTURE PROMOTION PROJECT, KSCPP , which is located 261West 35th Street between 7th and 8th avenue. This group welcomes you to the Hidden Wonders of Korea with documentary film screenings that introduce Korea's cultural and Industrial achievements followed by a traditional homemade Korean meal. This ongoing introductory event, scheduled at 6:30 pm,  is complimentary, but you must RSVP to kscpp1@gmail.com to attend.
      The historical film "The Grace of Korean Art & King Sejong the Great,"  was my favorite where I learned about King Sejong who founded, Hangul, the Korean language of compassion in the mid-15th century. A great ruler he believed and advocated, "If the people prosper, how can the King not prosper with them." A tenet that is the very core of Korea's progress and prosperity.  Other documentary films shown include. "Bridging Korea's Past and Present, The Legacy of Devotion and Serving the People Through Science & Technology.
       BOOKS OF KNOWLEDGE: A comprehensive selection of complimentary books on Korean history and culture are also available free of charge. My favorite was the book by the author, Chung Hyo Ye,"Tales of filial devotion, loyalty, respect and benevolence from the history and folklore of Korea."  Some of these stories of love, family, strangers and betrayal are so true to any one's life and all the handsomely-bound books can be had in English as well as Korean.  


TRADITIONAL HANBOK Gracious Korean women, wearing the traditional gown called Hanbok, greet guests at the KSCPP . Each garment is a work of art in itself, either embroidered or hand-painted on beautiful silk fabrics in colors that represent the five elements (earth tree, meal, water, fire). The Korean ladies dressed wo exquisitely adds such a traditional feel to a KSCPP program. Upcoming programs include:
       TASTE of  KOREA, a Korean Cooking Demonstration and home-cooked dinner, this Sunday, October 22 from 4-6 pm at a different location at 23rd Street.  Participants will receive recipes to take home and free books on Korean history and culture. Cost: $25.00. This is a popular event and seating is limited and an RSVP is required, email kscpp1@gmail.com.  At this event you will find out about the health benefits of Korean food and learn about the vegetarian tradition in Korea. Check their website at www.kscpp.net for other scheduled cooking classes.
       LOTUS FLOWER LANTERN CRAFT There are other wonderful programs here to enhance your Korean experience including the Lotus Flower Lantern Craft workshop starting with a short documentary film on the Korean artistic tradition and the meaning of the Lotus Flower. The ladies will be on hand to help you make a lovely lotus flower lantern using colorful paper and wire frames. Just so you know, participants can choose the color of the lotus flower for the lanterns. Class usually begins at 3pm and again seating is limited so you know an RSVP is required. The cost is minimal and you can even pay with the
the Paypal link.
      11th NATIONAL ESSAY CONTEST: To foster the understanding and appreciation of Korean history and culture, the KSCPP hosts its 11th national essay contest. which is open to Middle and High School Students.  The entrants are required to read Chung Hyo Ye, which I mentioned earlier was incidentally my favorite book. One of the questions posed to the entrants, which I thought was particularly apropos is "How could the values of Chung, Hyo and Ye be applied to the world today? Entries should be submitted electronically to kscppcontest@msn.com with the subject heading "2017 11th Essay Contest." Or mail to KSCPP, 158-16 46th Ave., Flushing, NY 11338.  Deadline for both the online submissions are due by January 15, 2018. The winners will be announced no later than April 1, 2018.
      Ta Ta Darlings!!! The Korean experience imbued with cultural and industrial significance is unfolding right here in New York City. Be there, it's so enchanting. Fan mail to Polly is always welcome at pollytalknyc@gmail.com.  Visit Polly's Blogs at www.pollytalk.com, just click on the link that resonates with your interest on fashion, visionary men, women determined to succeed, and poetry from the heart.


       
     

Monday, October 2, 2017

DRAWN TO GREATNESS: The Thaw Collection: Review by Polly Guerin

The Bathers ca 1900 Paul Cezanne 
If you have the collector's gene and wealth to acquire a vast collection, a specific genre of art, as time goes by and the final curtain closes in, you may have the urge to open a museum of your own, but donating to a museum may be the most realistic choice.
      Such is the case with the Thaw Collection in DRAWN TO GREATNESS, Master Drawings, which recently opened at The Morgan Museum and Library. The exhibition, on view through January 7, 2018,  focuses on works acquired by Eugene V and Clare E.
La Rond des petities Betonnes, Paul Gauguin 1888 
Thaw since 1994. In the decades since the 1950s, they have assembled one of the finest collections of drawings and watercolors in private hands. 
Image Left: The Bathers 1900 watercolor over graphite, Paul Cezanne (1839-1906)
       This is not the first time that the Shaw holdings have been shown at the Morgan. This is the fifth since 1975, which is a promised gift to the museum.  The collection was first promised to the Morgan in the same year by Life Trustee Eugene V. Thaw and the final gift of drawings came to the Morgan in January. As a body of work, representing so diverse a mix of artists, The Thaw collection of drawings is considered among the foremost assembled by an individual over the last fifty years.  
      DRAWN TO GREATNESS features over 150 masterworks highlighting pivotal artists and key moments in the history of draftsmanship.  In addition to the remarkable selection of modern works, exceptional sheets dating from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century are on view and most of the works have not been previously exhibited. A partial listing of of artists represented includes Rubens, Rembrandt, Piranesi, Watteau, Fragonard, Goya, Ingres, Turner, Degas, Cezanne, Gauguin, van Gogh, Matisse, Picasso, and Pollock. Image: Breton Girls Dancing, Pont-Aven, 1888, Paul Gauguin (1845-1903). 

This energetically worked pastel is preparatory for the painting by Paul Gauguin executed the summer of 1888, and first shown in Paris that fall; now it resides in the National Museum of Art in Washington D.C. 
      For the schedule of programs and lectures contact tickets@themorgan.org or 212.685.0008 ext 560.  Of particular note is DRAWN TO SONG, on Wednesday, October 11, 7:00 pm. To parallel the history of draftsmanship in Drawn to Greatness: Master Drawings from the Thaw Collection artists from The Glimmerglass Festival will perform a program reflecting the history of the art song. Selections will include songs and poetry contemporary to the artists featured in the Thaw collection. 
    Ta Ta Darlings!!! I still haven't decided where to donate my petite collection of art and artifacts. T'is a delimma, but I do so much enjoy my works of art, that I clearly cannot depart with then, Yet! Fan mail welcome: pollytalknyc@gmail.com. Visit Polly's Blogs at www.pollytalk.com and click in the left-hand column on the subject that resonates with your interest fron fashion to visionary men, women determined to succeed, and even poetry.
     
       

Monday, September 25, 2017

EXPEDITION: Fashion From the Extreme at FIT: Review by Polly Guerin

As world exploration into the remotest outposts of civilization draws modern explorers,  fashion rides the wave of adventure. What to wear?               Expeditions to the North and South poles, scaling mountain peaks, the depth of the ocean and outer space gave fashion designers reason to be inspired. They created fashions taking their cue from the practical clothing, often inspired by the Inuit. that adventure-seekers wore   
       However, it was not until the 1960's that these endeavors began to influence fashion. EXPEDITION: Fashion From The Extreme, at The Museum at The Fashion Institute of Technology is the first major exhibition to examine this fascinating subject on view through January 6, 2018.
     Let's credit Charles Darwin's seminal publication On the Origin of Species (1859), one of the most influential books of its day, with fueling the collective imagination to explore extreme
environments. Then, too, Charles Verne added to exploration enthusiasm with his science fiction thrillers. He was way ahead of his time with such books as From the Earth to the Moon (1865) and Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1871). Verne had anticipated space and deep sea travel decades before they became reality and his books inspired explorers and many creative fields, including fashion. 
       Of course, Artic-inspired fashion clothing that pre-dates the

1960s are rare, but couturiers took note.  Among them, Madame Gres began to design apres ski wear that resembled garments designed for explorers. Who better to emulate than the clothing invented by the Inuit. By he 1990s and into the 2000s life on he icebergs increasing inspired designers including Jean Paul Gaultier, Issac Mizrahi, Yohji Yamamoto. More recently, Joseph  Altuzarra's parkas and Karl Lagerfeld's faux fur creations for Chanel. Pictured Right: Yohji Yamamoto, ensemble, fall-winter 2000. Japan.
       Who doesn't own a down-filled coat? These fashion concoctions have become basic all time popular winter wear. Let's give credit, however, for the invention, to the outdoor clothing purveyor Eddie Bauer. In 1933, this firm patented the first down-filled jacket, and in 1937 American couturier Charles James designed the first fashion version made of elder down and white silk satin. 
     By the 1970s, both high-fashion designers and companies specializing in extreme environmental wear were making down and fiber-filled outwear and Tommy Hilfiger's "puffer" jackets were being worn by hip hop stars. Many designers today create versions of the down-filled coats that have become a mainstay in any fashionistas wardrobe.    

The global youth movement and Space Age influence brought into vogue garments that were dramatically different such as miniskirts and pantsuits with Andre Courreges, Pabo Rabanne and Pierre Cardin responding with cutting edge fashions.And ocean exploration has inspired more than new materials. Designers such as Alexander McQueen have crafted brilliant prints of otherworldly, bio luminescent creatures that live in the ocean's deepest environment. Image Left: Junya Watanabe, Comme des Garcon, fall-winter 2004. Japan
      Patricia Mears, deputy director wrote: "As fashion works to lessen it impact on the earth's fragile ecosystem, fanciful inter-pretations of expedition wear are being replaced by more functional, environmentally sustainable designs. Designers today are increasingly interested in the revelations, the technology, and the visuals of scientific discover, both in our everyday world and from the extreme."
       FIT will be holding a FASHION SYMPOSIUM, Fashion, Science and Exploration, October 10, 2017. To register go to he website, fitnyc.edu/museum or call 212 217 4585. EXPEDITION: Fashion From The Extreme tours take place Monday, Oct. 2, 6 pm, Wednesday, October 25, 6:30 pm and Monday, November 11, 6 pm.  Reservations are required as space is limited email: museuminfo@fitnyc.edu or call the phone number listed above.
     Ta Ta Darlings!!! I remember fashionista socialite, Mary Lou Whitney; she went to the North Pole on her honeymoon in the long, long ago and probably brought silk pajamas.  Enough said!
Fan mail welcome at pollytalknyc@gmail.com.  Visit Polly's Blogs at www.pollytalk.com and click in the left-hand column on subjects from visionary men to women determined to succeed, fashion and even poetry.

Monday, September 18, 2017

MODIGLIANI UNMASKED: Review By Polly Guerin

Paris, France, the unprecedented melting pot of the avant garde artists, welcomed the handsome Italian Sephardic Jew, Amedeo Clemente Modigliani (1884-1920), who would become renowned as a celebrated artist and sculptor. With a penchant for elongated figures and prominent noses he asserted his Jewish sensibilities and pictorial ideas through drawing and sculpture.  Image: Left to Right: LIMESTONE HEAD by Amedeo Modigliani's 1911-13.Image provided by Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation/Art Resource, New York. KNEELING CARYATID, 1911-12, Black crayon on paper. Paul Alexandre Family, courtesy of Richard Nathanson, London. JEANNE HEBUTERNE with Yellow Sweater, 1918-19, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Jeanne Hebuterne met the artist through her brother, Andre Hebuterne who had come to Paris to become an artist. Shortly after Jeanne was introduced to Modigliani she moved in with him against her family's wishes. Their union was recognized as a common law marriage and they had one child, Jeanne Modigliani. Life with Modigliani must have been had. He became an alcoholic and drug  addict probably due to mask his tuberculosis from his acquaintances. In France in the 1900s there was no cure and it was a horrible disease and those afflicted with it were ostracized. After Amedeo's death in 1920, the next day in despair Jeanne Hebuterne threw herself out of the family's 5th floor apartment building and died on impact. It is interesting to note that, in her short lifetime, Jeanne had become quite an accomplished artist and achieved recognition in art circles worldwide, along with her famous partner.       

When Modigliani arrived in Paris in 1906, the city was still rolling with anti-Semitism after the long-running tumult of the Dreyfus Affair, an 1895 scandal in which a French Jewish army officer had been falsely accused of treason, resulting in a surge of nationalism and he influx of foreign emigres, who re-settled within the nation's borders. In Paris, he chose to settle in Le Bateau Lavoie, a commune for penniless artists in Montmartre. With his cosmopolitanism and his fluent French he could easily have passed as gentile. He chose instead to use his work to question the very notion of identity.  As a result his oeuvre was exclusively figurative, in itself an eccentric choice with the experimental artistic milieu of Paris at the time.    
       This was a period of remarkable self-assertion for the artist, an Italian Sephardic Jew, within the community of predominantly Jewish immigrant artists to which he belonged, including Marc Chagall, Chaim Soutine and Jules Pascin. There in Paris, he also came in contact with other prominent artists including Pablo Picasso and Constantin Brancusi, and others. 
       When Modigliani moved to Paris, he came up against the idea of racial purity in French culture, whilst in Italy, he did not feel ostracized for being Jewish.  His Latin looks and fluency in French (a French mother and classical education)  he could have easily have assimilated. Instead his outsider status often compelled him to introduce himself with the words, "My name is Modigliani, I am Jewish."
Yet he found Paris unexpectedly difficult, suffering as he did recurrent bouts of tuberculosis and struggling financially--partly because he refused to take a job or seek commissions.  Modigliani was drawn to social outsiders, such as cabaret and circus performers, and to the image of the femme fatale, characteristic of one of his first exhibited paintings in Paris, The Jewess.  Image: Portrait of Paulette Jourdain, 1919)
       MODIGLIANI UNMASKED, is the first exhibition in the United states to focus on Modigliani's early works made in the years after he arrived in Paris. The exhibition on view at the Jewish Museum through February 4, 2018 puts a spotlight on Modigliani's drawings, with a large selection acquired directly from the artist by Dr. Paul Alexandre, a young physician, who became his close friend and first patron.  Alexandre amassed some 450 drawings directly from the artist and commissioned a number of portraits.  
       The exhibition includes a selection of drawings depicting Dr. Alexandre, as well as a mysterious, unfinished portrait, never before seen in the United States. Prominent in the collection are the stylized drawings relates to sculptures.  The influence of masks in particular is clearly visible in the many drawings and sculptures in the exhibition, which offers insights into Modigliani's signature style of graceful, elongated figures that were not well received during his lifetime. However, after his death he achieved greater popularity and his works of art achieved high prices. Seen within he scope of his brief fourteen-year career, his early work provides a context in which to reconsider what may have motivated Modigliani to develop his idiosyncratic
style of portraiture. He died of tubercular meningitis, life cut short at 35. 
    Ta Ta Darlings!!! Modigliani's short life reminds us to remember to make every day count and create in measure.  Fan mail welcome at pollytalknyc@gmail.com. Visit Polly's posted Blogs at www.pollytalk.com. Click in the left-hand column to links to visionary men, women determined to succeed, fashion and even poetry. 
       

Monday, September 11, 2017

ARTURO'S: Authentic Mainstay on West Houston Street: Review By Polly Guerin

In a city gone so modern that mom and pop and small specialty stores have disappeared, it is important to celebrate the importance of the locally owned old world businesses that foster character, loyalty, genuine caring and investment in the neighborhood. 
     As the old Italian neighborhoods rapidly changed, gentrified and were denuded of their colorful past, the restaurant ARTURO's, famed for its coal oven pizza since 1957, remains a steadfast slice of history with honest drinks and reasonable prices. It's one of those grand old New York spots that makes us feel at home. That may be he result of a warm welcome in this family-owned establishment that was started by their father Arthur, who borrowed $3,000, a tidy sum in those days, and engaged family members to help out.  Arturo's is now run by siblings with Lisa Giunta at the helm and others steering the restaurant forward as a mainstay in this ever changing neighborhood.
      However, this establishment is more than just a pizza place, it is authentic with old world charm. Hints of the influence from the old Italian neighborhoods of New York City, traditions long forgotten are kept intact at 106 West Houston Street. The walls with memorabilia and lots of photographs attest to the historical significance of the place, which is cozy but vibrantly alive.    
     JAZZ No Cover: Enter its portals into a dimly lit bar area where weathered leatherette booths in the entrance dining room are the preferred site to listen to the lively jazz band that plays nightly and there is no cover charge.   

     Here one can be assured to enjoy honest drinks and genuine food from the full Italian menu. Red sauce standards include parmigiana with veal or eggplant, and traditional pasta dishes such as shrimp marinara, and delectable mussels over biscuits,  Of course, regulars arrive consistently and new customers are lured by the crispy crusted pizzas, too big for one, but perfect for two hungry friends. Toppings on pizzas include Italian sausage, pepperoni, spinach, lobster, calamari and always fresh basil. Sidewalk seating is delightful in good weather but you will be disappointed because you cannot hear the jazz music that is played nightly.   

Arturo's can attest to knowing customers since they were children growing up with the kind of surroundings their mother trusted.  Although, Friday is big pizza day, everyday is a reason to head downtown to Arturo's where everyone is welcomed with open arms like family. Reservations are not necessary but large groups should call 212.677.3820.
    Ta Ta Darlings!!!   I had the mussels over biscuits, delicious!!! Fan mail welcome at pollytalknyc@gmail.com.  Visit Polly's Blogs at www.pollytalk.com with links in the left had column to visionary men, women determined to succeed, fashion and poetry.